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21 Day Racial Equity and Social Justice Challenge

YWCA Richmond is proud to join YWCA South Hampton Roads and YWCA Central Virginia to launch the 21 Day Racial Equity and Social Justice Challenge across the Commonwealth on July 1, 2020.

Emails will begin on Wednesday, July 1, 2020, and will be sent Monday through Friday from July 1, 2020 through July 29, 2020 You can join the challenge anytime.  Each day’s email has links to the previous days’ content so that you can look back and explore.

For 21 days, participants will receive a daily email to examine the history of systemic inequities in America and how it impacts communities of color today in order to help foster awareness, understanding, and collective action toward the elimination of racism.  Daily activities include:

  • Reading an article,
  • Listening to a podcast,
  • Learning how racial inequities affect voting, education, criminal justice, and public health at the local, state, and national levels, or
  • Reflecting on personal experience.

The work of justice starts with learning more.  We invite you to join this journey as together we challenge ourselves to recognize and understand the embedded issues related to racial inequity, in order to do more and be more – civically and interpersonally – until the world sees women, girls, and people of color the way we do: Equal. Powerful. Unstoppable.

 

What is the 21 Day Racial Equity and Social Justice Challenge?

The challenge is designed to create dedicated time and space to build more effective social justice habits, particularly those dealing with issues of race, power, privilege, and leadership.

You will be presented with daily email content such as reading an article, listening to a podcast, reflecting on personal experience, and more.  Emails will be sent Monday through Friday, and will include the links to the previous days so you can look back and explore.

Participation in an activity like this helps us to uncover how racial and social injustices are built into our voting, education, criminal justice, and public health systems and identify ways to dismantle racism and other forms of discrimination.  This is an exciting opportunity to dive deep into racial equity and social justice – to learn more, do more, and be more.  We hope you will join us on this journey!

 

What inspired YWCA’s Racial Equity and Social Justice Challenge

We would like to extend our gratitude to YWCA Cleveland for providing us with this tool.  This challenge was inspired by Food Solutions New England.  They were the first to adapt an exercise from Dr. Eddie Moore, Jr. and Debby Irving’s 21-Day Racial Equity Habit Building Challenge into an interactive program.

Week 1 – Voting

Before you get started, if you haven’t done so already, please fill out this pre-event survey to set your intentions and share your goals for the challenge with us. You can also join our Facebook group where participants can continue the conversation in a safe space. We also encourage you to refer to the Aspen Institute’s structural racism glossary for key terms and definitions that will come up in the challenge.

Participating with a group? Check out this toolkit for further engagement ideas throughout the challenge.

We want to thank Food Solutions New England for inspiring this challenge. They were the first to adapt an exercise from Dr. Eddie Moore and Debby Irving’s book into the interactive 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge, which they launched in 2014. We also want to thank our sisters at YWCA of Cleveland for sharing the 21 Day Challenge with us!

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: Watch this video that explains that while race and racism have a real and significant impact on our lives, race is a social construct and one that has changed over time. None of the broad categories that come to mind when we talk about race can capture an individual’s unique story. For more information, read this article on how science and genetics are reshaping our understanding of race.

OPTION 2: Read this article defining Anti Racism and why the term is so powerful. If you are ready for a deep dive, you can listen to the podcast featuring historian Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to be An Antiracist.

OPTION 3: Watch this video about the difference between being non-racist and anti-racist. YWCA’s 21 Day Challenge will encourage you and give you tools to be an anti-racist because it doesn’t require that you always know the right thing to say or do in any given situation. It asks that you take action and work against racism wherever you find it including, and perhaps most especially, in yourself.

2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which guarantees and protects women’s constitutional right to vote.

However, the fight for women’s suffrage was not as straightforward as you might think. Today we are going to examine the intersection of race and gender and how this played out during the fight for the 19th Amendment. Black women were marginalized in the movement and their contributions sidelined by history. Today we need to look back at these pioneering leaders and how they laid the groundwork for universal suffrage and the civil rights movement.

In addition to taking on one or all of the challenges below, consider adding Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All to your fall reading list.

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: Read this article about the Black suffragists who fought for the vote, while fighting racist backlash from the movement’s white leadership, many of whom did not believe that any Black person should have the right to vote before white women.

OPTION 2: Read about five amazing women of color who bravely fought for the abolition of slavery, the rights of women, and civil rights in the United States. They pioneered the idea of intersectionality more than a century before the term would be officially coined in 1989.

OPTION 3: Watch this video about the untold stories of Black women in the Suffrage Movement. This video encourages us to do more to honor and remember the Black women who bravely fought for universal suffrage.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

The State of Tennessee played a crucial role in ratifying the 19th Amendment by earning the distinction as the 36th and final state needed to make women’s suffrage the law of the land. Take 30 minutes to listen to this podcast and learn how race played a role in Tennessee’s women’s suffrage movement.

2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the passage of the 15th Amendment, which extended voting rights to all American men “regardless of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”

Today, we are looking at the history of voter suppression and how people of color were systemically kept from the ballot box and the challenges they had to overcome to exercise their right to vote, far after the 15th Amendment was ratified. This will provide much-needed context for tomorrow’s challenge where we will be showing how voter suppression has changed over time and how it is disenfranchising marginalized communities today.

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: From the 1890’s to the 1960’s literacy tests were designed to disenfranchise people of color from voting (white men were exempt). Print out and try to complete this test. Be sure to set a timer before you start, you would have been given 10 minutes to finish.

OPTION 2: View this interactive timeline of the history of the Voting Rights Act and see how access to the vote was expanded and restricted over time.

OPTION 3: Read this article highlighting the role that the Voting Rights Act played in protecting Asian Americans’ voting rights. Until 1952, federal policy barred immigrants of Asian descent from becoming U.S. citizens and having access to the vote.

Week 2 – Education

Before you get started, if you haven’t done so already, please fill out this pre-event survey to set your intentions and share your goals for the challenge with us. You can also join our Facebook group where participants can continue the conversation in a safe space. We also encourage you to refer to the Aspen Institute’s structural racism glossary for key terms and definitions that will come up in the challenge.

Participating with a group? Check out this toolkit for further engagement ideas throughout the challenge.

We want to thank Food Solutions New England for inspiring this challenge. They were the first to adapt an exercise from Dr. Eddie Moore and Debby Irving’s book into the interactive 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge, which they launched in 2014. We also want to thank our sisters at YWCA of Cleveland for sharing the 21 Day Challenge with us!

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: Watch this video that explains that while race and racism have a real and significant impact on our lives, race is a social construct and one that has changed over time. None of the broad categories that come to mind when we talk about race can capture an individual’s unique story. For more information, read this article on how science and genetics are reshaping our understanding of race.

OPTION 2: Read this article defining Anti Racism and why the term is so powerful. If you are ready for a deep dive, you can listen to the podcast featuring historian Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to be An Antiracist.

OPTION 3: Watch this video about the difference between being non-racist and anti-racist. YWCA’s 21 Day Challenge will encourage you and give you tools to be an anti-racist because it doesn’t require that you always know the right thing to say or do in any given situation. It asks that you take action and work against racism wherever you find it including, and perhaps most especially, in yourself.

2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which guarantees and protects women’s constitutional right to vote.

However, the fight for women’s suffrage was not as straightforward as you might think. Today we are going to examine the intersection of race and gender and how this played out during the fight for the 19th Amendment. Black women were marginalized in the movement and their contributions sidelined by history. Today we need to look back at these pioneering leaders and how they laid the groundwork for universal suffrage and the civil rights movement.

In addition to taking on one or all of the challenges below, consider adding Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All to your fall reading list.

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: Read this article about the Black suffragists who fought for the vote, while fighting racist backlash from the movement’s white leadership, many of whom did not believe that any Black person should have the right to vote before white women.

OPTION 2: Read about five amazing women of color who bravely fought for the abolition of slavery, the rights of women, and civil rights in the United States. They pioneered the idea of intersectionality more than a century before the term would be officially coined in 1989.

OPTION 3: Watch this video about the untold stories of Black women in the Suffrage Movement. This video encourages us to do more to honor and remember the Black women who bravely fought for universal suffrage.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

The State of Tennessee played a crucial role in ratifying the 19th Amendment by earning the distinction as the 36th and final state needed to make women’s suffrage the law of the land. Take 30 minutes to listen to this podcast and learn how race played a role in Tennessee’s women’s suffrage movement.

2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the passage of the 15th Amendment, which extended voting rights to all American men “regardless of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”

Today, we are looking at the history of voter suppression and how people of color were systemically kept from the ballot box and the challenges they had to overcome to exercise their right to vote, far after the 15th Amendment was ratified. This will provide much-needed context for tomorrow’s challenge where we will be showing how voter suppression has changed over time and how it is disenfranchising marginalized communities today.

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: From the 1890’s to the 1960’s literacy tests were designed to disenfranchise people of color from voting (white men were exempt). Print out and try to complete this test. Be sure to set a timer before you start, you would have been given 10 minutes to finish.

OPTION 2: View this interactive timeline of the history of the Voting Rights Act and see how access to the vote was expanded and restricted over time.

OPTION 3: Read this article highlighting the role that the Voting Rights Act played in protecting Asian Americans’ voting rights. Until 1952, federal policy barred immigrants of Asian descent from becoming U.S. citizens and having access to the vote.

Week 3 – Criminal Justice Reform

Before you get started, if you haven’t done so already, please fill out this pre-event survey to set your intentions and share your goals for the challenge with us. You can also join our Facebook group where participants can continue the conversation in a safe space. We also encourage you to refer to the Aspen Institute’s structural racism glossary for key terms and definitions that will come up in the challenge.

Participating with a group? Check out this toolkit for further engagement ideas throughout the challenge.

We want to thank Food Solutions New England for inspiring this challenge. They were the first to adapt an exercise from Dr. Eddie Moore and Debby Irving’s book into the interactive 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge, which they launched in 2014. We also want to thank our sisters at YWCA of Cleveland for sharing the 21 Day Challenge with us!

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: Watch this video that explains that while race and racism have a real and significant impact on our lives, race is a social construct and one that has changed over time. None of the broad categories that come to mind when we talk about race can capture an individual’s unique story. For more information, read this article on how science and genetics are reshaping our understanding of race.

OPTION 2: Read this article defining Anti Racism and why the term is so powerful. If you are ready for a deep dive, you can listen to the podcast featuring historian Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to be An Antiracist.

OPTION 3: Watch this video about the difference between being non-racist and anti-racist. YWCA’s 21 Day Challenge will encourage you and give you tools to be an anti-racist because it doesn’t require that you always know the right thing to say or do in any given situation. It asks that you take action and work against racism wherever you find it including, and perhaps most especially, in yourself.

2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which guarantees and protects women’s constitutional right to vote.

However, the fight for women’s suffrage was not as straightforward as you might think. Today we are going to examine the intersection of race and gender and how this played out during the fight for the 19th Amendment. Black women were marginalized in the movement and their contributions sidelined by history. Today we need to look back at these pioneering leaders and how they laid the groundwork for universal suffrage and the civil rights movement.

In addition to taking on one or all of the challenges below, consider adding Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All to your fall reading list.

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: Read this article about the Black suffragists who fought for the vote, while fighting racist backlash from the movement’s white leadership, many of whom did not believe that any Black person should have the right to vote before white women.

OPTION 2: Read about five amazing women of color who bravely fought for the abolition of slavery, the rights of women, and civil rights in the United States. They pioneered the idea of intersectionality more than a century before the term would be officially coined in 1989.

OPTION 3: Watch this video about the untold stories of Black women in the Suffrage Movement. This video encourages us to do more to honor and remember the Black women who bravely fought for universal suffrage.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

The State of Tennessee played a crucial role in ratifying the 19th Amendment by earning the distinction as the 36th and final state needed to make women’s suffrage the law of the land. Take 30 minutes to listen to this podcast and learn how race played a role in Tennessee’s women’s suffrage movement.

2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the passage of the 15th Amendment, which extended voting rights to all American men “regardless of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”

Today, we are looking at the history of voter suppression and how people of color were systemically kept from the ballot box and the challenges they had to overcome to exercise their right to vote, far after the 15th Amendment was ratified. This will provide much-needed context for tomorrow’s challenge where we will be showing how voter suppression has changed over time and how it is disenfranchising marginalized communities today.

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: From the 1890’s to the 1960’s literacy tests were designed to disenfranchise people of color from voting (white men were exempt). Print out and try to complete this test. Be sure to set a timer before you start, you would have been given 10 minutes to finish.

OPTION 2: View this interactive timeline of the history of the Voting Rights Act and see how access to the vote was expanded and restricted over time.

OPTION 3: Read this article highlighting the role that the Voting Rights Act played in protecting Asian Americans’ voting rights. Until 1952, federal policy barred immigrants of Asian descent from becoming U.S. citizens and having access to the vote.

Week 4 – Public Health

Before you get started, if you haven’t done so already, please fill out this pre-event survey to set your intentions and share your goals for the challenge with us. You can also join our Facebook group where participants can continue the conversation in a safe space. We also encourage you to refer to the Aspen Institute’s structural racism glossary for key terms and definitions that will come up in the challenge.

Participating with a group? Check out this toolkit for further engagement ideas throughout the challenge.

We want to thank Food Solutions New England for inspiring this challenge. They were the first to adapt an exercise from Dr. Eddie Moore and Debby Irving’s book into the interactive 21-Day Racial Equity Challenge, which they launched in 2014. We also want to thank our sisters at YWCA of Cleveland for sharing the 21 Day Challenge with us!

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: Watch this video that explains that while race and racism have a real and significant impact on our lives, race is a social construct and one that has changed over time. None of the broad categories that come to mind when we talk about race can capture an individual’s unique story. For more information, read this article on how science and genetics are reshaping our understanding of race.

OPTION 2: Read this article defining Anti Racism and why the term is so powerful. If you are ready for a deep dive, you can listen to the podcast featuring historian Ibram X. Kendi, author of How to be An Antiracist.

OPTION 3: Watch this video about the difference between being non-racist and anti-racist. YWCA’s 21 Day Challenge will encourage you and give you tools to be an anti-racist because it doesn’t require that you always know the right thing to say or do in any given situation. It asks that you take action and work against racism wherever you find it including, and perhaps most especially, in yourself.

2020 marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment, which guarantees and protects women’s constitutional right to vote.

However, the fight for women’s suffrage was not as straightforward as you might think. Today we are going to examine the intersection of race and gender and how this played out during the fight for the 19th Amendment. Black women were marginalized in the movement and their contributions sidelined by history. Today we need to look back at these pioneering leaders and how they laid the groundwork for universal suffrage and the civil rights movement.

In addition to taking on one or all of the challenges below, consider adding Vanguard: How Black Women Broke Barriers, Won the Vote, and Insisted on Equality for All to your fall reading list.

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: Read this article about the Black suffragists who fought for the vote, while fighting racist backlash from the movement’s white leadership, many of whom did not believe that any Black person should have the right to vote before white women.

OPTION 2: Read about five amazing women of color who bravely fought for the abolition of slavery, the rights of women, and civil rights in the United States. They pioneered the idea of intersectionality more than a century before the term would be officially coined in 1989.

OPTION 3: Watch this video about the untold stories of Black women in the Suffrage Movement. This video encourages us to do more to honor and remember the Black women who bravely fought for universal suffrage.

 

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

The State of Tennessee played a crucial role in ratifying the 19th Amendment by earning the distinction as the 36th and final state needed to make women’s suffrage the law of the land. Take 30 minutes to listen to this podcast and learn how race played a role in Tennessee’s women’s suffrage movement.

2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the passage of the 15th Amendment, which extended voting rights to all American men “regardless of race, color, or previous condition of servitude.”

Today, we are looking at the history of voter suppression and how people of color were systemically kept from the ballot box and the challenges they had to overcome to exercise their right to vote, far after the 15th Amendment was ratified. This will provide much-needed context for tomorrow’s challenge where we will be showing how voter suppression has changed over time and how it is disenfranchising marginalized communities today.

 

CHALLENGES

OPTION 1: From the 1890’s to the 1960’s literacy tests were designed to disenfranchise people of color from voting (white men were exempt). Print out and try to complete this test. Be sure to set a timer before you start, you would have been given 10 minutes to finish.

OPTION 2: View this interactive timeline of the history of the Voting Rights Act and see how access to the vote was expanded and restricted over time.

OPTION 3: Read this article highlighting the role that the Voting Rights Act played in protecting Asian Americans’ voting rights. Until 1952, federal policy barred immigrants of Asian descent from becoming U.S. citizens and having access to the vote.